Monthly Archives: January 2015

“Cool” New Courses for Entity Framework

donfrozen-rev-300x300We’ve joined forces with our Yeti instructor, Don Kiely, to create two new Entity Framework 6.1 courses for you. (I wonder how he can type when he’s that “Frozen?” I guess I’ll just have to “Let It Go.”)

No, Don doesn’t normally look this way in the winter. And no, he didn’t have a run in with Elsa. His friend Tracey Martinson was not too frozen to take this picture of Don after he went for a run when the temperature was -18°F (which is -27.8°C or 245 K). In between running, caring for his sled dogs, and never being asked “Do you Want to Build a Snowman?”, Don has created these exciting new Entity Framework courses:

Entity Framework 6.1: SQL Server Features – Now available
In this course you’ll learn about a few of Entity Framework’s “For the First Time in Forever” additions to support SQL Server features. You’ll start with a look at Entity Framework’s support for hierarchyID or, rather, its missing support. Then you’ll jump into one of the best new features in Entity Framework in a long time— enums—which you can use to protect the integrity of your data. Next you’ll explore Entity Framework’s support for spatial data, which covers location-aware applications and data. You’ll wrap up with a look at table-valued functions and their support in Entity Framework.

Entity Framework 6.1: Code-First Development – Coming 2/2/15
You will begin by learning how code-first works by default, which will probably work for most applications early in their development cycle. But when you’re ready to deploy the application to a production server, or need more flexibility (in a “Fixer Upper” kind of way), you’ll learn how Entity Framework creates a database. You’ll see how to create a code-first model and create a database from it, and see an application that makes use of it to maintain data in the database. You’ll also learn how to customize the database using data annotations, and the DBModelBuilder API which lets you write code instead of using data annotations. Lastly you’ll see how code migration is a newer feature of code first that goes beyond just deleting and recreating the database when the model changes.

donkiely

Be sure to check out all of our Entity Framework courses including these two new additions. By the way, here is a picture of Don all thawed out. I doubt he thinks “Reindeer are Better than People,” because he may not have met one yet. Let’s hope “In Summer” up in Alaska, Don’s runs won’t have that frozen look.

My apologies to Disney for using Frozen songs as puns.

About the Author


brianblogpic-150x150

Brian Ewoldt is the Project Manager for LearnNowOnline. Brian joined the team in 2008 after 13 years of working for the computer gaming industry as a producer/project manager. Brian is responsible for all production of courses published by LearnNowOnline. In his spare time, Brian enjoys being with his family, watching many forms of racing, racing online, and racing Go-Karts.

 

What’s new in Java 7 SE

javalogo-161x300

So you’ve heard all the puns about the Java programming language and coffee. But do you really know Java? Did you know it was first developed by Sun Microsystems for handheld devices and interactive television in the early 90’s and it was called Oak? In 1995, the name was changed to Java to reflect its new use for internet applications. The name was chosen to due to the large amounts of coffee consumed by its creator, James Gosling. (Java is also a name of an island of Indonesia—a place I wouldn’t mind being about now since the Minnesota temperatures of late have been well below zero.)

Today Java is used by internet developers around the world. It is a “free and open source software” (FOSS), thus its popularity. Java shares many traits with the C/C++ programming languages, so if you are familiar with C/C++, you will understand the Java syntax. Java is still used to develop applications on mobile devices as well on the new smart televisions on the market today.

We recently released two courses for Java 7 SE covering what’s new in this latest version.

Java 7 SE: Enhancements and Concurrency
In this course you’ll get a whirlwind overview of the new packages and frameworks, features, JVM enhancements, and Java language updates that are part of Java SE 7. You’ll spend some time on those language enhancements, small changes that make a big difference in your code. You’ll also learn about the concurrency utilities provided by Java SE 7, including the brand new Fork Join framework, which supports parallel processing, by taking full advantage of the multiple processors on most modern systems. You’ll explore the new ThreadLocalRandom class, which generates random numbers in multi-threaded applications without the concurrency issues seen in Java SE 6. Then you will learn about the new Phaser synchronization mechanism which is used to ensure threads march in step together, from one phase of the application to the next.

Java 7 SE: IO, New IO and Network Protocols
The Java SE 7 platform gives you a brand new file based I/O architecture, NIO2. This new architecture solves most of the problems we saw in the original stream based I/O. In this course you’ll learn how the NIO2 Path class is used to represent the underlying file system syntax in a manner that is transparent to the application. Next you’ll see how the NIO2 Files class works with the Path class. You’ll take a look at the new NIO2 asynchronous channels which let you monitor and control the completion of your asynchronous events. NIO2 also gives you a new asynchronousChannelGroup to group these channels, and supply them with a pool of threads for resource sharing. You’ll take a look at the new WatchService file change notification API, which lets you register to be notified when files or directories change on the file system. After your tour of NIO2, you’ll move to the new networking features provided by Java SE 7. You’ll experiment with the URLClassLoader, which now implements the Closable I/F and its close() method. Then you’ll learn about the new protocols you can now access. One is the Stream Control Transmission Protocol, or SCTP, and another new protocol is Sockets Direct Protocol, or SDP.

These courses are presented by our newest instructor, Brigitte Birze. Brigitte is a seasoned software development professional with over 25 years of experience in Corporate IT and Engineering across many verticals. Brigitte has been involved in every phase of the software development lifecycle from the perspective of several roles: individual contributor, team lead, S/W architect, system engineer, proposal author, and project manager. Her innovative software architectures have resulted in six published papers and eight patents. Brigitte’s dynamic communication skills, paired with her depth and breadth of technical knowledge, give her the unique ability to make the complex understandable, and to convey technical concepts to cross-functional groups, speaking at the business or technical level.

I invite you to check out these new Java 7 SE courses, and watch for more courses and a webinar to be presented by Brigitte in the near future.

About the Author


brianblogpic-150x150

Brian Ewoldt is the Project Manager for LearnNowOnline. Brian joined the team in 2008 after 13 years of working for the computer gaming industry as a producer/project manager. Brian is responsible for all production of courses published by LearnNowOnline. In his spare time, Brian enjoys being with his family, watching many forms of racing, racing online, and racing Go-Karts.

Java logo and wordmark” by Transferred from en.wikipedia to Commons. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons.