Tag Archives: sharepoint 2010

SharePoint 2010: Master Pages in SharePoint 2010

An installation of SharePoint 2010 contains many master pages. There are master pages that preserve backward compatibility for sites migrated from WSS 3.0 or MOSS 2007 including the old master page for Team sites, default.master, and master pages for application pages including simple.master and application.master.

There are also new master pages that support the new look and feel of SharePoint 2010. These are the v4 master pages and generally speaking, there is a v4 master page that corresponds to the old master pages. For example, v4.master is the replacement for default.master and simplev4.master is the replacement for simple.master.

Master Page Locations

You can find SharePoint’s various master pages in a few different locations depending on the master page and the context of its use. Within a SharePoint site, master pages are in a document library called the Master Page Gallery. The URL for this library relative to the Web’s URL is _catalogs/masterpage.

When you create a site, SharePoint provisions the appropriate master pages from the SharePoint root to the Master Page Gallery. The stock master pages that deploy to the Master Page Gallery from the SharePoint root are in Template\Global. However, there are additional master pages that support various application and administration pages that never deploy to a site located in Template\Layouts and in Template\Admin.

Often you can find additional custom master pages in the SharePoint root as part of features that deploy master pages via a Module feature element or as part of a custom site template.

Associating Master Pages with Content Pages

You can associate a master page with a content page in several ways. Some of these are dynamic and resolve at runtime to the SPWeb’s MasterUrl or CustomMasterUrl property, while others are static.

To create a dynamic association, use one of the following tokens as the value of the MasterPageFile attribute in the Page directive.

  •  ~masterurl/default.master
  •  ~masterurl/custom.master

Figure below shows the ~masterurl/default.master token in action in SharePoint
Designer. In this case it resolves to /_catalogs/masterpage/v4.master, but you
could change the SPWeb.MasterUrl property; the master page would change
without modifying the content pages.

Masterpagesimg1

Alternatively, you can specify the exact master page you want your content page to use with one of the static tokens.

  •  ~site/ActualFileName.master
  •  ~sitecollection/ActualFileName.master

The page parsers interpret both sets of tokens at runtime, but it is also possible to control the selection of a master page dynamically with .NET code in a page’s OnPreInit method or by using an HttpModule.

doug (frame 367 of smile clip)This post is an excerpt from the online courseware for our Microsoft SharePoint 2010 for Developers course written by expert Doug Ware.

Doug Ware is a SharePoint expert and an instructor for many of our SharePoint 2007 and SharePoint 2010 courses. A Microsoft MVP several times over, Doug is the leader of the Atlanta .NET User Group, one of the largest user groups in the Southeast U.S., and is a frequent speaker at code camps and other events. In addition to teaching and writing about SharePoint, Doug stays active as a consultant and has helped numerous organizations implement and customize SharePoint.

Create Child Controls – Microsoft SharePoint 2010

Most web controls that have visual elements compose other controls into a greater whole. Every web control contains a Controls collection property that contains the controls of which it is composed.

The controls in the Controls collection are called child controls because a page is easily visualized as a tree of controls with the page as the root. Each node of the tree can have zero or more children.

Use the CreateChildControls to instantiate any child controls that your web control contains.

The first two things that happen when ASP.NET renders a page are the initialization and loading of each node of the tree. The next thing that happens is the loading of state into each node of the tree so that the tree correctly represents any user input.

State is stored in a hidden form field named __VIEWSTATE and its contents are used to rehydrate a page between postbacks. The loading of ViewState works only if ASP.NET is able to match each node in the current rendering with the previous version—the one with which the user interacted and submitted input.

Consider the following code snippet:

 

If you ran this code in ASP.NET 2.0, perhaps on a WSS 3.0 or MOSS 2007 site, the Web Part would render a button 50 pixels wide without error. However, the event handler will not fire when a user clicks the button because the MyWebPart class creates a new instance of the Button class each time it initializes. The myButton variable then references a new button.

When the ViewState loads to indicate that the user clicked a button, the new button has replaced the original button in the tree and the event doesn’t fire.

Here’s the correct way to write this code:

 

In this example, you are still creating a new instance each time—ASP.NET is stateless after all, but the timing of the operation allows the page rendering infrastructure to correctly associate the button with its state when it adds the button to the Controls collection.

When working with the page rendering life cycle, timing is everything. ASP.NET 3.5, the basis of SharePoint Foundation, is more forgiving in this regard. However, unless you know that your custom Web Part will never run in an older version of ASP.NET, it is a best practice to follow the simple rule—create your child controls inside CreateChildControls.
doug (frame 367 of smile clip)This post is an excerpt from the online courseware for our Microsoft SharePoint 2010 for Developers course written by expert Doug Ware.

Doug Ware is a SharePoint expert and an instructor for many of our SharePoint 2007 and SharePoint 2010 courses. A Microsoft MVP several times over, Doug is the leader of the Atlanta .NET User Group, one of the largest user groups in the Southeast U.S., and is a frequent speaker at code camps and other events. In addition to teaching and writing about SharePoint, Doug stays active as a consultant and has helped numerous organizations implement and customize SharePoint.

Lists and Libraries in the Object Model – Microsoft SharePoint 2010

The functionality that features provide to define and create lists is useful, but the static nature of XML means that you need more tools at your disposal to fully exploit the power of lists and libraries. Fortunately, just as you’d expect, the core SharePoint assembly contains a robust set of classes to allow automation of lists and their contents.

As you explore these classes, you may find yourself in familiar territory: The names may be new, but the techniques closely resemble those that you use to manipulate any .NET collection. The techniques for adding, editing, and deleting list items resemble those for every data access stack from Microsoft since Windows development first became popular in the 1990s.

In fact, the only unusual aspect of working with SharePoint lists and libraries is the query syntax which you will see in a later section.

You can accomplish a great deal in code with a relatively small number of
classes:

  • SPListCollection
  • SPList
  • SPDocumentLibrary
  • SPListItemCollection
  • SPListItem
  • SPListView
  • SPContentType
  • SPField

Each SPWeb instance exposes an SPListCollection via the Lists property that contains all of the SPList instances in the web. Some of the SPList instances are document libraries and are actually of type SPDocumentLibrary. Each SPList and SPDocumentLibrary exposes its items via the Items property, which is of type SPListItemCollection. Each item is an SPListItem.

The other classes, SPListView, SPContentType, and SPField represent a list’s presentation and structure.

Retrieving List Instances

If you need to access a list within a page context, perhaps as part of a custom list form, you can get the current List or ListId from SPContext.Current. In other situations, feature event receivers for instance, you access a list instance via the containing web.

Lists and libraries are members of a specific web. Therefore, instances of the SPWeb class expose a property named Lists that returns an instance of SPListCollection that you can use to enumerate all of the lists in the web.

The SPListCollection Item property has three overloads that you can use to retrieve a specific list instance. One takes the list’s GUID, one takes the list’s name, and the other takes the list’s ordinal position in the collection.

Alternatively, you can use the SPWeb.GetList method to retrieve a list based on its URL. This method is especially versatile because the URL can point directly to the list or to any of its forms using an absolute or site relative format.

doug (frame 367 of smile clip)This post is an excerpt from the online courseware for our Microsoft SharePoint 2010 for Developers course written by expert Doug Ware.

Doug Ware is a SharePoint expert and an instructor for many of our SharePoint 2007 and SharePoint 2010 courses. A Microsoft MVP several times over, Doug is the leader of the Atlanta .NET User Group, one of the largest user groups in the Southeast U.S., and is a frequent speaker at code camps and other events. In addition to teaching and writing about SharePoint, Doug stays active as a consultant and has helped numerous organizations implement and customize SharePoint.

Core Foundation Assemblies

Before you can write any managed code for SharePoint you must reference the assembly that contains the classes you need. Although there are many assemblies in a SharePoint installation, there are a few that you will use often. If you are using one of the SharePoint project templates in Visual Studio 2010, the appropriate references are usually preconfigured when you create the Visual Studio solution.

The most commonly used assemblies are in the SharePoint root within the ISAPI folder although there are many located in other places, especially in the global assembly cache. Some of the most commonly used assemblies are:

  • Microsoft.SharePoint: The core classes for SharePoint Foundation.
  • Microsoft.SharePoint.Client: The core classes for client applications using the managed client object model.
  • Microsoft.SharePoint.Linq: LINQ to SharePoint.
  • Microsoft.SharePoint.WorkflowActions: SharePoint specific workflow actions.

Core Classes

The classes that represent the elements common to all SharePoint sites are in the Microsoft.SharePoint assembly. Figure 15 shows a few of these classes. If you have taken the time to become familiar with SharePoint as a user, the purpose of most of these should be obvious to you at this point—SPSite is a site collection, SPWeb is a web, and so on.

corefoundationimg1 Some of the commonly used classes in Microsoft.SharePoint.dll.

SPContext

SPContext is the only class shown in figure above that doesn’t represent an item in a SharePoint site. You use this extremely handy class when writing code that runs when SharePoint renders a page, for example in a Web Part or user control, to gain access to the current request. You can use SPContext . Current to get access to the current:

  •  Site
  •  Web
  •  List
  • ListItem
  •  More…

It is important to note that SPContext is always governed by the security context of the user that is requesting the page. You can get the current user programmatically via the CurrentUser property of the SPWeb class. For example:

SPUser currentUser = SPContext.Current.Web.CurrentUser;

Because SPContext.Current uses the security context of the current user your code will throw a security exception if it attempts to perform any operations that the user does not have permission to perform.

Common Conventions

As you saw in Figure above, it is easy to guess the names of most of the core classes—just add an SP to the front of the name. For example, it should come as no surprise that the class you use to work with an alert is SPAlert! Other common conventions include:

  • An item’s name is usually the Title property such as SPWeb.Title and SPList.Title.
  • Most collection indexers provide the following overloads for accessing collection items:
    • Ordinal index
    • Guid
    • Title (if applicable)
  • Most changes to property changes only persist when you call the object instance’s Update() method.

doug (frame 367 of smile clip)This post is an excerpt from the online courseware for our Microsoft SharePoint 2010 for Developers course written by expert Doug Ware.

Doug Ware is a SharePoint expert and an instructor for many of our SharePoint 2007 and SharePoint 2010 courses. A Microsoft MVP several times over, Doug is the leader of the Atlanta .NET User Group, one of the largest user groups in the Southeast U.S., and is a frequent speaker at code camps and other events. In addition to teaching and writing about SharePoint, Doug stays active as a consultant and has helped numerous organizations implement and customize SharePoint.

Project Templates

The first thing you do when building a new solution in Visual Studio 2010 is to select a project template. The template you select determines the tools that are available and how Visual Studio behaves when you build the project. Visual Studio comes with project templates for a variety of Windows and Web application types. Among these are a number of templates for building SharePoint applications.

Several of the project templates concern development of specific types of features. Each of these is a starting point that allows you to add any type of feature, but that starts with an element manifest that corresponds with the project template’s name. The feature oriented project templates are:

  •  List Definition
  •  Content Type
  •  Module
  •  Event Receiver

Workflows are an important component of most SharePoint environments. There are five workflow specific project templates for SharePoint, two of these support workflow development for SharePoint 2007. The SharePoint workflow templates are:

  •  Sequential Workflow
  •  State Machine Workflow
  • Import Reusable Workflow
  •  SharePoint 2007 Sequential Workflow
  •  SharePoint 2007 State Machine Workflow

The SharePoint 2007 workflow templates are the only direct support Visual Studio offers developers writing code for SharePoint 2007. All of the other project templates support only SharePoint 2010.

The remaining SharePoint project templates are:

  • Empty SharePoint Project: An empty project with SharePoint tools.
  • Visual Web Part: A user control and a Web Part wrapper with a feature to add the Web Part to the deployment target.
  • Business Data Connectivity Model: A project with tools for building Business Connectivity Services applications.
  • Site Definition: A project pre-populated with files for a custom site definition.
  • Import SharePoint Solution Package: A project with imported contents from a WSP usually generated via the Save Site as Template functionality of a SharePoint site.

Most large solutions start with the Empty SharePoint Project template.

doug (frame 367 of smile clip)This post is an excerpt from the online courseware for our Microsoft SharePoint 2010 for Developers course written by expert Doug Ware.

Doug Ware is a SharePoint expert and an instructor for many of our SharePoint 2007 and SharePoint 2010 courses. A Microsoft MVP several times over, Doug is the leader of the Atlanta .NET User Group, one of the largest user groups in the Southeast U.S., and is a frequent speaker at code camps and other events. In addition to teaching and writing about SharePoint, Doug stays active as a consultant and has helped numerous organizations implement and customize SharePoint.

Site Collections

Thumbnail for 597When you access a SharePoint site with any type of client application, including the browser, you are first accessing a site collection that contains the site you ultimately want to access.

A site collection contains one top-level, or root, web, and zero or more subsites. The site collection acts as the root unit of authorization for all the webs it contains and it can exist at the root of a Web application or under another site collection.

A very important difference between a site collection and a web is that the site collection acts as a boundary for both security and aggregations. This distinction often trips people up and can cause some frustration. SharePoint has a number of mechanisms for querying and aggregating information, but they are generally limited to the confines of a site collection.

Most SharePoint items with which a user interacts exist within the context of a site collection, and an individual user can have permission to access many site collections. However, each site collection has different permission sets. In this respect, you can think of query visibility as similar to the data in two different databases that you want to aggregate by using a SQL query. In the case of databases, you generally have to use some sort of extension or intermediate step to create the correct result set. The same is true of data in two site collections.

Logical Site Hierarchy Example

It is tempting to think of a site collection as the top of a hierarchy of webs, as shown in Figure 1, because a site collection is assigned a URL when a user creates it, but this is not correct.

SiteCollections1Figure 1. A site is not the root of a hierarchy of webs.

Single Site Collection Example

A more accurate depiction of a site collection is as a container that has one or more webs. The root web uses the URL that the user specifies during the site collection’s creation.
Consider a simple company portal that is configured as follows:

  • Mycorp.com
    • Mycorp.com/Accounting
    • Mycorp.com/HR
    • Mycorp.com/HelpDesk

This topology is certainly functional, but what if the Accounting web needs a different security model and is the property of the accounting department including responsibility for user management? If so, it is possible to preserve the URL scheme with a little extra configuration and use multiple site collections instead of a single site collection containing every subsite.

Partitioning with Site Collections

By default, when you create a new site collection using SharePoint Central Administration, the URL will be something like http://myserver/sites/newsite.

The sites portion of the URL is called a managed path. Conversely, the page to create a new subsite allows you to specify the URL without the sites element, and if you want to create newsite as a subsite instead of a site collection, the URL will be http://myserver/newsite.

Consider the example shown in Figure 2. This URL scheme requires additional configuration to implement, but duplicates with site collections the URL scheme of the subsite for the accounting web.

SiteCollections2Figure 2. Managed paths allow control
when using multiple site collections in a 
single Web application.

You can duplicate the URL scheme used for a subsite with a site collection by defining a managed path.

doug (frame 367 of smile clip)This post is an excerpt from the online courseware for our Microsoft SharePoint 2010 for Developers course written by expert Doug Ware.

Doug Ware is a SharePoint expert and an instructor for many of our SharePoint 2007 and SharePoint 2010 courses. A Microsoft MVP several times over, Doug is the leader of the Atlanta .NET User Group, one of the largest user groups in the Southeast U.S., and is a frequent speaker at code camps and other events. In addition to teaching and writing about SharePoint, Doug stays active as a consultant and has helped numerous organizations implement and customize SharePoint.

Record Management in SharePoint 2010

Thumbnail for 597

 

SharePoint 2007 supported only the Records Center site template for records management, and did not provide support for records management for individual libraries on non-Records Center sites. The fact that SharePoint 2010 now has this in-place capability does not do away with the need for the Records Center site template. You would continue to choose the Records Center template for the following scenarios:

  • A centralized approach to records management is preferred to simplify auditing and reporting tasks.
  • The need exists to perform records management on entities other than document library members, such as email messages or SharePoint list items.
  • The need exists to organize archived material without requiring human intervention on submitted items.

Organizing Content

When using the centralized approach of the Records Center site, it is likely that multiple libraries will be needed for archiving records, particularly in a case that will include many thousands of documents. There are three particular problems that must be overcome in such a case:

  • Thousands of documents must be routed to the proper library to support a well-organized site, but the routing must be carried out without the burden of human intervention.
  • Users must be blocked from ignoring the routing mechanism and choosing their own destination libraries.
  • The archive site must be organized in such a way that folder content does not exceed recommended maximum capacities.

The Content Organizer feature, which is automatically enabled for Records Center sites, is designed to address these very challenges. The Content Organizer creates a special library named the Drop Off Library. This library is the central location for submitting documents to the Records Center site. Documents submitted to this library are routed to another library based on defined rules. When you author these rules you specify the following:

  • One or more conditions to determine if a submitted document matches the rule.
  • A destination library where matching documents are routed.
  • A priority value, to indicate which rule should be applied in a case where more than one rule matches a document.

If a document is submitted that does not match a rule then the submitter and the owner of the site are notified. In addition, the document remains in the Drop Off Library until the site owner intervenes with a new rule.

In addition to applying rules for routing, the Content Organizer feature also provides the Folder Partitioning capability. Folder Partitioning provides an automatic mechanism to ensure that folders do not contain an excessive number of items by automatically subdividing a folder once it reaches a certain threshold.

While you can create your own destination libraries in the Records Center site, there is a library already created for you named Record Library. The significance of this library is shown in Figure 1: Documents added to this library will automatically be declared as records.

RecordManagementinSharePoint2010img1

Figure 1. The Record Library automatically declares a document as a record.

In Place Records Management permits a user to manually indicate that a document is a record and subject to records management rules. In the case of the Record Library, the declaration is automatic: simply placing a document in this library implicitly declares that it is a record.

Managing the Records Center

While all of the settings for the Records Center site may be configured via the Site Settings page, the Records Center site template includes a dedicated page (see image below) for convenient access to site management tasks such as defining rules, organizing libraries, and generating reports.
RecordManagementinSharePoint2010img2

The Records Center Management page provides
convenient access to standard configuration tasks.

John.UnderwoodThis post is an excerpt from the online courseware for our Microsoft SharePoint 2010: Enterprise Content Management course written by expert John Underwood.

John Underwood is a technical evangelist for a SharePoint consulting company, with 30 years of programming experience, including 20 years on the Microsoft platform and 10 years with .NET. John also has extensive experience using, configuring, and programming SharePoint.

 

 

Document Sets

Thumbnail for 597When users work with documents, there are occasions where more than one document is related to a particular task or project. In the past a user might group these together within a folder in a SharePoint document library. However there are some drawbacks to using folders:

 

  • Users can sometimes find folders to be unwieldy and confusing, particularly when deeply nested.
  • Folders do not permit the documents to be acted upon as a group, but rather serve simply as a container.

SharePoint 2010 introduces a new feature, known as Document Sets, to address this situation. As the name implies, a Document Set is a special content type that allows the grouping of related documents.

While a Document Set is similar to a folder conceptually, it holds some distinct advantages over folders:

  • Document Sets appear as a single item in a library, and thus represent a user-friendly alternative to multiple levels of nested folders.
  • Document Sets support versioning, and may be versioned independently of the documents they contain.
  • Document Sets support metadata columns that can convey information about the set, such as the current state in a submission process.
  • Document Sets can be manipulated by workflows, permitting the entire set of documents to be treated as a single entity.

Before Document Sets can be used the Document Sets site collection feature must be activated. In order to use Document Sets in a particular library, the library must allow management of content types and must include the Document Sets content type.
The default behavior for the Document Set content type is to permit the user to add multiple documents to an instance of the type. However, the sets can be customized so that a specific number and type of document are automatically included in the set. As an example, a Document Set for a sales proposal might always include a spreadsheet for sales numbers, a presentation to pitch the proposal, and a document outlining the terms of the proposal. You can create a custom content type that inherits from Document Set and tailor it to meet the exact number and kind of documents needed.

Each Document Set has a welcome page associated with it. You can customize this page via the browser and SharePoint Designer to make it easy and convenient for users to consume.

John.UnderwoodThis post is an excerpt from the online courseware for our Microsoft SharePoint 2010: Enterprise Content Management course written by expert John Underwood.

John Underwood is a technical evangelist for a SharePoint consulting company, with 30 years of programming experience, including 20 years on the Microsoft platform and 10 years with .NET. John also has extensive experience using, configuring, and programming SharePoint.

SharePoint 2010 Search

The need for enterprise search is a key driver for implementations of Microsoft SharePoint 2010 Search. The out-of-the-box SharePoint Server search features are useful, but getting the most benefit from SharePoint Server search requires configuration and customization.

The SharePoint Server object model makes it possible for application developers to implement powerful custom functionality, but in many cases you can meet requirements by configuring a site in the browser. This chapter focuses on customization of search by using the out-of-the-box features. SharePoint Server comes with two search site definitions you can use as a basis: Basic Search Center and Enterprise Search Center. Both site definitions create pages that contain Search web parts. You can use these web parts to extend sites based on the site definitions. You can also use them to create custom search pages in sites based on any site definition simply by enabling the correct set of features.

SharePoint Server does not simply provide the capability to perform searches. It also enables you to tune and improve your search results to provide the most relevant information to your users. When you consider the potential reduction in the cost of time spent looking for information and the cost of duplicated effort, it is easy to understand why customizing search is worthwhile. To this end, SharePoint Server includes reporting and optimization tools for search. With this information, you can define different types of search by defining search scopes. For example, you can create a scope to support search pages that enable users to find people within a geographic location or find documents of a particular type.

SharePoint 2010 also adds a new search feature knows as refiners. Refiners, and the accompanying Refinement Panel Web Part, provide users with a quick look at the kinds of matches they are getting. It also provides a meaningful way for users to whittle down the results by key areas such as document type, author, and origin of the search result.

You can also promote specific content based on its importance or relevance. You can specify the “best bets” for searches based on specific keywords. You can improve the quality of your keywords and best bets based on what you learn by analyzing the site’s usage reports.

Basic Search Center

As the name implies, the Basic Search Center site template provides basic
search functionality. A new site based on this template has several applications
pages, including:

  • default.aspx for entering search queries.
  • results.aspx for showing search results.

Basic Search Center supports minimal customization, and does not permit the addition of new pages. Basic Search Center works with all versions of SharePoint 2010. (For a comparison of search capabilities in versions of SharePoint 2010 visit http://go.appdev.com/?id=SXEG).

Enterprise Search Center

The Enterprise Search Center (formerly known as Search Center with Tabs) is designed to provide greater scalability and customization than that Basic Search Center template. Enterprise Search Center is available with SharePoint Server 2010 Standard and Enterprise editions. In order to use the Enterprise Search Center, the SharePoint Server Enterprise Site Collection feature and SharePoint Server Publishing Infrastructure feature must be enabled (see Figure below).

ECM Ch05 Blog.pdf - Adobe Acrobat Pro

The Figure above. Required features for using Enterprise Search Center.

When it comes to customization, there are two significant differences between Basic Search Center and Enterprise Search Center. First, Enterprise Search Center includes a Pages library where you can create, customize, and publish search pages. Second, Enterprise Search Center includes the ability to provide tabbed search pages. The out-of-box template includes tabs for All Sites and People. You may modify the tab to include custom pages, scopes, etc.

 

John.UnderwoodThis post is an excerpt from the online courseware for our Microsoft SharePoint 2010: Enterprise Content Management course written by expert John Underwood.

John Underwood is a technical evangelist for a SharePoint consulting company, with 30 years of programming experience, including 20 years on the Microsoft platform and 10 years with .NET. John also has extensive experience using, configuring, and programming SharePoint.

User Profiles and My Sites

Although you can view and modify a user’s profile properties in Shared Services Administration, your users cannot, and they need a way to update their information. SharePoint Server provides this functionality with My Sites. However, My Sites have much more functionality than the basic ability to work with profile properties.

A My Site is a self-service personalized site that contains private pages that are visible only to the owner of the site. A My Site allows consumption and manipulation of data of interest to the owner—a private dashboard. It also contains pages that are visible to the public and/or the site owner’s colleagues.

My Sites also serve an important role in creating a unified experience between SharePoint and the Office client applications and in targeting links to specific audiences based on profile data.

Configuring My Sites

You configure My Sites by using SharePoint Central Administration and The User Profile Service Application page you used earlier in the chapter. A My Site uses a normal site definition. The site definition specifies a dependency that requires you to create My Site instances only within a specialized site collection based on the My Site Host site definition. You can create a My Site Host by using either the standard Create Site Collection page or by specifying that SharePoint create one automatically when you create a new User Profile
Service Application.

A single instance of the User Profile Service Application supports exactly one My Site Host. However, it is possible to have more than one instance of the User Profile Service Application in an environment, and therefore more than one My Sites host. This is common in large portals that span multiple geographic locations. The My Sites Settings configuration includes:

  • Setup My Sites: Specifies the location of the My Site Host as well as the managed path for My Sites.
  • Configure Trusted Host Locations: Connects multiple instances of the User Profile Service Application.
  • Configure Personalization Site: Adds personalization site navigation links to the My Site left navigation.
  • Publish Links to Office Client Applications: Publishes links to SharePoint sites and lists when opening and saving documents from Office client applications.
  • Manage Social Tags and Notes: Finds, manages, and deletes social tags.

Linking to Office Client Applications

You can cause a user’s My Site to associate specific document libraries with their local machine profile. These libraries will appear in the Save dialog box when users work with Microsoft Office applications. This important functionality can encourage users to save public documents to appropriate libraries. Without this functionality, they are much less likely to put their documents in appropriate locations because they must manually add the
locations.

You can target links to users with simple rules based on information found in their profile or by their group memberships.

Personalization Links

You can also target links to appear on a My Site’s Quick Launch menu by creating personalization links. Personalization links, like links to Office client applications, are an invaluable way to direct users to content without a lot of effort or training.

As with links to Office applications, you can target personalization links to users with simple rules based on information within their profiles or by their group memberships.

 

John.UnderwoodThis post is an excerpt from the online courseware for our Microsoft SharePoint 2010: Enterprise Content Management course written by expert John Underwood.

John Underwood is a technical evangelist for a SharePoint consulting company, with 30 years of programming experience, including 20 years on the Microsoft platform and 10 years with .NET. John also has extensive experience using, configuring, and programming SharePoint.