Why Sleep When You Can Drink Coffee? (Part 3)

My two previous blogs discussed both coffee/caffeine and sleep, to an extent, and the way they operate individually.  Now let’s address an important question regarding their overlap with one another:

Can coffee be an effective replacement for sleep when it comes to brain functioning and mental capabilities, specifically with learning and memorizing?

Unfortunately, the answer is a resounding “not really”.

To see why this is true, let’s briefly look at the three main components of learning/memorizing:

  • Acquisition/encoding, which is the actual experiencing of something new
  • Consolidation/storage, where information is made smaller and committed to memory
  • Recall/retrieval, which is the ability to remember a memory later on

Acquisition and recall happen while you are awake: you consciously consume new information or try and remember old information. However, consolidation—which is essential to learning and remembering something long term because it is when our brain forms new neural connections to store information—happens mostly during sleep.

A recent study performed by researchers at Johns Hopkins and UC-Irvine found that caffeine can in fact help memory consolidation if it is consumed shortly after someone learns something new. This would suggest that it does impact step 2, even though the caffeine is consumed while you are awake and consolidation happens while you are asleep.

Without sleep, the impact of the caffeine on memory would be negligible because there
wouldn’t be time for the brain to actually perform the task of consolidation anyway.

One of the biggest reasons why we cannot learn well without enough sleep is because of the timing of when we memorize things during sleep and how long it takes for one cycle of sleep to complete.

Just like the repairing of our muscles, our brain restores itself most during deep sleep (stages 3 and 4 of NREM) and REM sleep.

It takes roughly 70-90 minutes for our body to enter into REM sleep, which is the most important stage for learning and memory. Once there, we only spend about 20 minutes in REM during our first sleep cycle. As we progress into further cycles, we begin to spend more and more time in REM sleep.

So, it is easy to see why we do not learn well when we aren’t sleeping well: our brains need a good amount of time in REM sleep, but we don’t get it unless we stay asleep for multiple cycles.

Adults need roughly 7.5-9 hours of sleep per night (yikes, I never get that much) to be fully functional (some need more and a few less), which is roughly 4-6 cycles of sleep. Thus, sleeping 4-6 hours a night means you could be missing multiple cycles of REM-rich sleep that you need for your brain to consolidate memories and remember processes.

And this is only talking about missing one night of good sleep. The reality is that many of us are consistently losing sleep on a night-to-night basis, resulting in sleep deprivation.

Unfortunately, something many people may not Sleep Versus Coffeeknow is that sleep deprivation is cumulative. This means that if you go 5 days in a row with those 4-6 hours of sleep, you could be 10-20 hours in debt, rather than just a couple hours from an individual night. Because the amount you need to sleep does not reset from night to night, over time this built up sleep debt will cause you to consistently perform worse in almost every area—cognitive, physical, reaction time, etc.

While coffee can help a little bit for a short time to combat this, it simply cannot overcome such a significant and powerful phenomenon. Plus, the extra jolt you get from coffee to help ward off sleep deprivation probably isn’t making you more focused than you would be if you had a proper amount of sleep. Rather, it is simply trying to get you close to the level of efficiency you would be operating at if you had the right amount of sleep in the first place. And, when the coffee wears off, you will feel extra tired because your brain is being overloaded with the sleep-inducing chemical adenosine that the caffeine is no longer blocking.

With this in mind, the conclusion is that there is simply no replacement for sleep. Almost all the research shows that sleep is potentially the most important thing you can do for your emotional, physical, and mental health, and for your ability to learn.

Coffee can help you to an extent when you aren’t able to rest up fully, but it can never truly serve as a replacement for a good night’s rest, especially when it comes to your ability to learn and remember things.

Ultimately, your ability to concentrate, perform, and learn is at its prime when you have the right number of hours of sleep, not the right number of cups of coffee.

Happy sleeping, enjoy your coffee, and happy learning,

Craig

About the Author

Craig-PhotoCraig Jensen is the President and CEO of LearnNowOnline. Craig has led the company’s change from instructor-led classroom training, to self-study CD/DVD training, to the award winning online learning solutions offered today. Craig is passionate about helping individuals and businesses of all sizes solve their problems through practical learning and technology. He is involved in setting direction for the company, including selecting training content for development with resources to support all learning styles. He is also involved in The CEO Roundtable organization in the Twin Cities as well as the Minnesota High Tech organization. In his spare time, Craig loves to travel, golf, and partake in water sports of all kinds.

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Hey, So What’s New With You?

It’s easy these days to get too busy with life in general, or waiting in line for the new Star Wars movie, and forget to connect with old friends and colleagues. In that spirit, and because I don’t have a tent that could hold up to 16 days of queuing in Minnesota, I wanted to tell you what’s been happening with us!

We’ve been busy writing new content, filming and releasing new courses, and preparing for our 6-month-long ice fishing season (dontcha know).

Fishing ShackFun fact; we actually have entire cities that pop up on the ice each year, and they are so established that stores follow suit and mail is delivered on a daily basis. Have you seen Grumpy Old Men? That’s it. There’s even a Grumpy Old Men festival each year, with ice fishing and ice shack contests. Why? We tend not to ask that question when trying to stay warm & entertained during the arctic freeze. Hey look, Paul Bunyan!

Speaking of freezing (prepare to have your mind blown by this segue), personal security on your computer has always been a top priority for users. No one wants to deal with a slow computer, infected with various viruses and malware, so we do everything we can to protect ourselves from that unfortunate situation; though, attackers have larger and more valuable game in mind these days. As more and more embarrassing headlines continue to pop up, everyone from small business owners to fortune 500 companies are looking for the perfect way to protect their user’s confidential information.

Allow me to introduce our brand new “Security” library! Queue the music!

LearnNowOnline has just released a Security library, full of the training you’ll need to effectively protect your company and applications from the tech world’s evildoers. Among other things, this library includes 3 robust OWASP training courses:

OWASP: Forgery and Phishing

OWASP: Threats and Session Security

OWASP: Misconfiguration and Data Encryption

The Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP) is a global nonprofit organization devoted to improving security for web applications. The Top 10 Project, first created by OWASP in 2003,
is among its most popular and widely known tools. The Top 10 Project is a lineup of the 10 leading web application security risks affecting users and companies worldwide; illustrating each vulnerability, as well as recommending examples and approaches to avert them. LearnNowOnline’s OWASP courses will turn you into a Jedi master of security (too many Star Wars references?), covering the full Top 10 Project list.

Hot off the press, and also part of our new Security library, are 4 fantastic courses on Certified Ethical Hacking (CEH):

CEH: Intro to Ethical Hacking

CEH: Operating Systems and Hacking

CEH: Threats and System Hacking

CEH: Malware and Social Engineering

Looking for more?  Stay tuned as many more security courses are in the works and coming soon!

Well, that there’s about all the time I have for today. Time to sharpen up my crampons and ready the sled. See you on the lake? You betcha!

About the Author

Zach YoungZach Young manages the LearnNowOnline customer support department. In addition to making strange but surprisingly delicious smoothies, Zach divides his time between the LearnNowOnline recording studio, providing sales demos for new and existing clients, and ensuring that each customer is taken care of. In his spare time, Zach enjoys globetrotting with his wife, playing and recording music, and attempting to get the required 1.21 gigawatts for Doc Brown’s DeLorean.

 

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Why Sleep When You Can Drink Coffee? (Part 2)

Sleep is one of the biggest mysteries … why do we need it?

Although we still can’t really answer that question properly, scientists have made strides in understanding what it does, how it works, and what happens to our bodies and brains when we aren’t getting enough of it.

My last post discussed coffee/caffeine and how it affects our brain.  Following this blog post, I will look at how coffee and caffeine overlap with sleep, and whether caffeine can actually help to replace sleep.Getting Sleep

Before looking at that relationship, however, let’s look at how sleep works so that we know what we are dealing with.

Here’s some of what we know: (a snoozer for you if you don’t like facts)

Sleep is comprised of two different stages: NREM (non-rapid eye movement) and REM (rapid eye movement). A majority of our time sleeping is spent in NREM (roughly 75-80 percent) which has four stages of its own where we move progressively deeper into sleep. After these four stages, we move into REM (the other 20-25 %), where we get some of our deepest and most restorative sleep.

NREM begins with a very light stage 1 sleep where we drift in and out of being awake and asleep for about 10-20 minutes. After this, we enter stage 2, which is deeper and more stable. We spend about 50 percent of our total time asleep in this stage.

Once we move to stage 3 and 4, we enter SWS (slow-wave sleep), or “deep sleep.” Our blood pressure and body temperature drop, as does our breathing rate. Our muscle tissue and energy begin to be restored, partially because of the release of different hormones. During these stages we have little-to-no eye movement or muscle activity. Our brain also begins to consolidate memories, which is an essential function for not only remembering and recalling information later on, but also for making room for new memories to be stored.

After the 4 stages of NREM sleep, we finally enter into REM sleep. Here, true to its name, our eyes move rapidly as we dream vividly. Our breathing becomes quick and irregular and our muscles often become paralyzed, although our heart rate and blood pressure rise. REM sleep, along with stage 3 and 4 of NREM, is essential because of its physical, mental, and emotionally restorative powers.

Even though we don’t know why we need sleep, it is clear that it is incredibly important. Sleep’s restorative functions facilitate much of our mental and physical health, including our ability to learn efficiently.

But, the real question is, is sleep essential for learning? We already know that coffee allows our brain to fire more neurons when it is consumed because the caffeine blocks the chemical adenosine responsible for slowing down nerve activity. Firing more neurons allows for higher brain activity/efficiency and more capacity for performing tasks.

Isn’t that enough to facilitate learning?

Sorry for the teaser but… Stay tuned for part 3.

Craig

 

About the Author

Craig-PhotoCraig Jensen is the President and CEO of LearnNowOnline. Craig has led the company’s change from instructor-led classroom training, to self-study CD/DVD training, to the award winning online learning solutions offered today. Craig is passionate about helping individuals and businesses of all sizes solve their problems through practical learning and technology. He is involved in setting direction for the company, including selecting training content for development with resources to support all learning styles. He is also involved in The CEO Roundtable organization in the Twin Cities as well as the Minnesota High Tech organization. In his spare time, Craig loves to travel, golf, and partake in water sports of all kinds.

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Why Sleep When You Can Drink Coffee?

As I am sitting in my office trying hard to not fall asleep, I am realizing I didn’t get enough sleep last night.  If you are like me (and 82% of adults nationwide), you probably drink many cups of coffee every morning. It not only feels like a great way to wake up but also seems to help create an energy boost after not sleeping enough the night before.

I am always interested in learning, so I’ve looked into the effects of both coffee and sleep on the body and the brain, specifically.  It’s fascinating–in my opinion–how coffee and sleep can impact your ability to learn.

I’ll start with coffee, and if you don’t want to know the fascinating stuff, just read the next
sentence then go pour yourself a cup.

CoffeeBoostMost of us know that caffeine is a stimulant but few likely know how drinking a cup actually affects us, other than making us feel more alert.

Coffee (caffeine) doesn’t really provide a boost of new energy.  It actually tricks our brain into thinking that we aren’t running out of the energy that we already have. This is because, to the brain, caffeine looks just like the chemical adenosine, which is naturally released over the course of a day.

Adenosine is largely what is responsible for causing us to become sleepy because as it builds up over the day and binds to receptors in the brain, it slows down nerve cell activity, causing you to progressively feel the need to sleep and recuperate.  However, because caffeine looks like adenosine to the brain, when it is ingested, it binds to these receptors and blocks the adenosine from doing so. Because caffeine doesn’t have the same “slowing” effect as adenosine, your brain doesn’t register that it’s time for sleep.

Because of this effect, you become less drowsy and your brain is able to fire neurons at a higher pace and continue working at a better efficiency.  The problem with this is that we “crash” later in the day because all of the built up adenosine that has been blocked can finally rush to the receptors, overloading them and bringing a feeling of extreme drowsiness.

In addition to its ability to “block” sleepiness, caffeine also helps produce adrenaline, which makes the heart beat faster and increases blood flow. And, some recent studies seem to indicate that if you consume coffee right after learning something new, there is a better chance you will be able to remember it the next day.

ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ, above was a real snoozer, huh?

Of course, “everything in moderation:” scientists say that up to 400 mg of caffeine is ok on a daily basis, but anything more could become excessive. That’s the equivalent of about 4-5 cups of coffee, 10 cans of caffeinated pop, or two energy drink shots, depending on the strength of each drink.

One downside is that if you drink coffee (caffeine) consistently, your body will build up a “tolerance” (this is actually your brain adding more adenosine receptors that the caffeine can bind to) and thus will require more of it to achieve the same effect. The easiest way to limit this is to be mindful; try to limit your caffeine intake when possible so that when you do need that boost, you won’t have to take in an unhealthy amount of caffeine.

So, is coffee a sufficient replacement/solution for not sleeping enough? And does it impact learning?

Stay tuned,

Craig

 

About the Author

Craig-PhotoCraig Jensen is the President and CEO of LearnNowOnline. Craig has led the company’s change from instructor-led classroom training, to self-study CD/DVD training, to the award winning online learning solutions offered today. Craig is passionate about helping individuals and businesses of all sizes solve their problems through practical learning and technology. He is involved in setting direction for the company, including selecting training content for development with resources to support all learning styles. He is also involved in The CEO Roundtable organization in the Twin Cities as well as the Minnesota High Tech organization. In his spare time, Craig loves to travel, golf, and partake in water sports of all kinds.

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The Good, the Bad, and the Hacked

Queue the sunset, the cheesy music, and the…  laptop?

White Hat Cowboy

So what is ethical hacking?  It sounds like an oxymoron, how can hacking anything be ethical?  As with most things in our wonderful world, they can be used for good or for bad.  It all depends on how they’re applied.

Just like an old Clint Eastwood western, the good guys wear white hats and the bad guys wear black hats.  Things aren’t much different in the modern age of hacking, though we’ve likely traded in the 10 gallon Stetson for something a little more sporty.  My apologies to any 10 gallon cowboy hat lovers out there.  Ethical hackers, or “White Hats”, use their knowledge for the good of the program or company; testing vulnerabilities and possible weaknesses, as well as suggesting ways to proactively correct them.  Non-ethical hackers, or “Black Hats”, can use the same skill set for personal gain, bringing down a competitor, or just causing general vandalism electronically.

We’ve all heard about millions of consumers having their personal data stolen when a large corporation is hacked, and this can be extremely costly for both the company and for the consumer.  Protecting that sensitive information is paramount, and many corporations are turning to ethical hackers to combat the onslaught of potential attacks.  Let’s face it, the more secure your system is, the more likely a customer is willing to do business with you.

Enter our brand new Certified Ethical Hacking course coming in late October!  IT expert and Systems Architect Rafiq Wayani was in our studio just 2 weeks ago to film this course.  Rafiq also hosted a live webinar during his visit, and archival footage of that event can be viewed on our webinars page.

www.learnnowonline.com/webinars

Check out our webinars, and our various security training courses, to ensure that your defenses are up to par with today’s Black Hats.  Giddy up!

About the Author

Zach YoungZach Young manages the LearnNowOnline customer support department. In addition to making strange but surprisingly delicious smoothies, Zach divides his time between the LearnNowOnline recording studio, providing sales demos for new and existing clients, and ensuring that each customer is taken care of. In his spare time, Zach enjoys globetrotting with his wife, playing and recording music, and attempting to get the required 1.21 gigawatts for Doc Brown’s DeLorean.

 

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MVC 6: Your Web Development World is About to Get Rocked!

If you missed the live-stream of our latest webinar on 7/22/2015, never fear! Check out the link below to get yourself up to speed with MVC 6. The webinar is led by instructor and skijoring enthusiast, Don Kiely, and I should warn you in advance …it will rock your world!

shutterstock_rockrollFor years, Microsoft did its best in battling rapid changes with the Internet to keep its ASP.NET and MVC technology up to speed. However; it’s been nearly 15 years since ASP.NET first hit the web, and those changes simply became too dramatic to overcome.

Enter Visual Studio 2015, Microsoft’s way of throwing out the “old ASP.NET manual” and rebuilding things from the ground up. Visual Studio 2015 was released on 7/20/2015, along with the .NET Framework 4.6 and updated web development tools. With MVC being part of ASP.NET, it has strapped itself in and come along for the update adventure!

This massive update now sees MVC boasting new features like broad support for new web technologies, as well as editor updates for JSON, HTML, and JavaScript. It will also now be much easier and more fun (!) to write robust web applications thanks to tools like HTML5 and CSS.

So this is a big deal?

Absolutely! Not only is the jump from ASP.NET to ASP.NET 5 as significant as switching from Classic ASP to ASP.NET was, but this bad boy is also open source! MVC, Web API, and Web Pages have been combined into a single unified open source programming model, which is hosted on GitHub. There are new tag helpers, view components, simpler dependency management, dependency injection, and more!

As you can see, there is suddenly a lot of stuff to learn about the all new Visual Studio 2015. With our new webinar, you will get a high level look at the newest MVC 6 and ASP.NET 5 features, as well as a jumpstart on building web applications using the new Microsoft stack. Instructor Don Kiely will walk you through these new and exciting changes and features, and have you ready to be a Visual Studio superstar in no time.

Check out the link below (it’s free)…just be sure to turn the volume up to eleven!

http://www.learnnowonline.com/webinars

NOTE: Both MVC 6 and ASP.NET 5 are included with this release; however, you cannot yet use them for production purposes.

The RC1 (release candidate 1) for ASP.NET 5 is slated for release in November 2015, which will have a “Go Live License”. This “Go Live License” indicates that Microsoft is ready to fully support ASP.NET 5 and MVC 6 and that they are confident that users will be able to use the technologies for production applications.

A helpful roadmap of release dates can be viewed here:

https://github.com/aspnet/Home/wiki/Roadmap

About the Author:

zach2Zach Young manages the LearnNowOnline customer support department. In addition to making strange but surprisingly delicious smoothies, Zach divides his time between the LearnNowOnline recording studio, providing sales demos for new and existing clients, and ensuring that each customer is taken care of. In his spare time, Zach enjoys globetrotting with his wife, playing and recording music, and attempting to get the required 1.21 gigawatts for Doc Brown’s DeLorean.

 

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Learn, Retain, And Succeed

Previously, I addressed the different ways in which people learn best. I referenced the VARK guide to different learning styles, designed by Neil Fleming. He outlined four main learning styles: Visual, Aural, Read/Write, and Kinesthetic. Fleming identified many factors/dimensions that can also affect how well we learn on a case-by-case basis, but overall these other considerations and external factors are usually secondary to the four VARK styles.

I think of the four styles above in simple terms: See, Listen, Read, Do. People learn best in one or more of these styles and each person is unique, which is why I think it is critical that people be able to pick the learning style or styles that fit them best. The best learning content will encompass all four of these styles.

Many articles relating to different learning styles and effective methods of retaining information are centered on improvements in a school/education based setting. These may seem irrelevant for someone focused on Web development or IT training.

However, if you take the time to read some of these articles and think about the information contained within them, you can find valuable knowledge that will help with your ability and approach to learning and mastering web development and new applications.

One article like this is featured in the New York Times under the “Well” tab of their “Health” section.  In it, author Tara Parker-Pope summarized a recently published book titled How We Learn: The Surprising Truth About When, Where, and Why It Happens written by fellow NYT author Benedict Carey.

The link of the NYTimes article is shown at the bottom of this blog, check it out.

Parker-Pope (via Carey) suggests that even though someone may receive good grades on an exam, that doesn’t mean that they truly or effectively learned the material they were studying (I am sure many of us have first-hand experience with this). The reason for this is that many people “cram” a large amount of information during one session, often at the last minute. While this may work as a short-term solution (like for a test the next day), it is rare for cramming to be an effective method for understanding and remembering information, processes, and concepts long-term. The brain functions better for long-term learning when it studies and practices things multiple times over a spaced-out stretch of time. Attempting to learn massive amounts of information in one session can overload it and sap its ability to categorize information as being important enough to remember permanently.

So what does this have to do with mastering Developer, IT Pro and/or Design skills?

We know the importance of understanding the best style or styles in which you learn (VARK). We also know that having access to content that spans all of these styles is invaluable—which is why we offer many different forms of our material—because it allows every individual to play to their unique learning-style strengths.

Equally as important to effective learning, though—as this New York Times article highlights—is more than just understanding your learning styles, and having content that compliments them: it also includes the way in which you go about taking in, absorbing, and remembering that content.

The amount of information involved with learning and mastering a new application or developer’s tool can easily become overwhelming if you do not have a solid, manageable approach. You may not always comprehend things right away, and sometimes you may need to revisit different sections of a training program to get a better grasp on certain content or concepts.

The best content should allow you to take things step-by-step, piece-by-piece. Online content is especially great because it allows you to revisit anything at any time, and from any location. Mapping out the most effective and efficient learning plan for you based off your learning styles, learning pace, and the content you will be consuming can go a long way towards helping you succeed in your career.

When it comes to online Developer, IT Pro, and Design skills, you should strive to learn as efficiently and effectively as you can. You should seek out the most accessible, diverse, and up-to-date training on the market, from knowledgeable professionals who truly want to help you achieve your learning goals. You should demand a training solution that offers a variety of different tools and styles—whether that be video, courseware and books, pre and post-testing, hands-on labs, “follow the expert” or “try it out” features, or even simply written training manuscripts for those who prefer to internalize through reading.

Pace yourself, and know that learning these different technologies and tools is often a marathon, not a sprint. Figure out your learning styles and use our training tools to play to those strengths. Don’t be afraid to review concepts you need more practice with, and if you are using LearnNowOnline as your guide, utilize our pre-tests to determine what you need help with and out post-tests to see how well you are mastering the material. Additionally, make sure you are keeping yourself healthy and happy outside of work too—whether that is through good eating, exercise and/or (especially!) sleeping habits—so that you are ready and able to focus on learning when you are on the job (more about eating and sleeping later).

Happy Learning

Craig

 

Check out the article “Better ways to learn” at

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/10/06/better-ways-to-learn/?_r=0

For more info on the Vark Guide see http://vark-learn.com/home/

 

About the Author

Craig-PhotoCraig Jensen is the President and CEO of LearnNowOnline. Craig has led the company’s change from instructor-led classroom training, to self-study CD/DVD training, to the award winning online learning solutions offered today. Craig is passionate about helping individuals and businesses of all sizes solve their problems through practical learning and technology. He is involved in setting direction for the company, including selecting training content for development with resources to support all learning styles. He is also involved in The CEO Roundtable organization in the Twin Cities as well as the Minnesota High Tech organization. In his spare time, Craig loves to travel, golf, and partake in water sports of all kinds.

 

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It’s a Bird, it’s a Plane…it’s Selenium

superhero-selenium

When you hear the word “Selenium” what comes to mind? Is it the metal that Wolverine’s blades and bones are made of? Nope, that’s adamantium. Is it the material that Iron Man’s suit is made of? Nope, that would be gold titanium alloy.

Selenium is a real element on the periodic table that has the symbol SE, an atomic number of 34, and semi conductive properties. Selenium used to be used in photocells and other electronics, but has since been replaced by silicon. Today you will find Selenium used in glass-making and pigments, plus there are very small traces in some dietary supplements.

Now, with the miracle of modern technology, Selenium has been turned into an open source web site testing/automation tool. It provides developers with scriptable record and playback features allowing them to write automation tests in a number of popular programming languages including C#, Java, JavaScript, Haskell, Objective-C, Perl, PHP, Python, and Ruby. The Selenium suite of tools can be run in a Windows, Apple OS X, or Linux operating system and supports most major web browsers.

Now that you know the power of Selenium you must remember…with great power comes great responsibility!  Become a Selenium superhero with these two new courses featuring expert Brigitte Birze:

Selenium Fundamentals: IDE (Now available)
This IDE is a tool that can be used by itself or in conjunction with the other Selenium tools to quickly prototype test scripts or locate web elements. In this course you will learn about the Selenium tool suite and get in-depth look at the Selenium IDE.

Selenium Fundamentals: WebDriver (Coming July 6th)
WebDriver is the main tool in the Selenium tools suite, with the ability to natively drive a web application in the same way a human user would. This course will teach you the basics of creating WebDriver applications. You will learn how to build with the WebDriver libraries, how to configure WebDriver to talk natively to the different browsers, and how to use the main WebDriver classes to exercise your web applications.

Selenium can’t make Superman weak…that would be Kryptonite. And Selenium really won’t give you super-human powers like Batman. However, you can be a superhero for your company when you use Selenium to save time and money when testing your next web application.

About the Author

BrianBlogpicBrian Ewoldt is the Project Manager for LearnNowOnline. Brian joined the team in 2008 after 13 years of working for the computer gaming industry as a producer/project manager. Brian is responsible for all production of courses published by LearnNowOnline. In his spare time, Brian enjoys being with his family, watching many forms of racing, racing online, and racing Go-Karts.

 

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May the Webinars Be With You

May seems to be webinar month here at LearnNowOnline. With three exciting events on the calendar, it’s a great time to explore some of the most buzzed-about new and updated technologies including Visual Studio 2015, Windows 10, and Swift. We hope you’ll join us for these upcoming events:

JoeMayoWhat’s New in Visual Studio 2015 | Register now
On May 13th Joe Mayo will once again present “What’s New in Visual Studio 2015.” In this live session, you will get a great overview of the changes from the previous versions of Visual Studio. You will also learn about some of the updates that were released at Build, including the newest version called Visual Studio Code. Code is a free version of Visual Studio 2015 that is really a very powerful editor that runs on multiple platforms. You’ll also learn of any new updates that may come from Microsoft before the 13th.

benkovich-bwBuilding Apps for Windows 10 with Visual Studio  | Register now
On May 27th Mike Benkovich will continue the Visual Studio conversation when he presents “Building Apps for Windows 10 using Visual Studio.” Windows 10 is expected to bring the best of Windows 7 and Windows 8 plus some new advancements. Mike will cover this exciting update, including related information recently released at Build.

Introduction to Swift  | Watch recording
In this webinar recorded earlier this month, Jordan Hudgens covers Swift, the newest programming language from Apple. Swift is designed for Cocoa and Cocoa Touch, and is meant to be easier, faster, and safer than Objective-C.  You can use Swift to replace or work in conjunction with Objective-C. Watch the replay now:

swiftwebinar

This webinar coincides with the release of two new Swift courses from LearnNowOnline: Swift for iOS: Basics and Swift for iOS: Creating an Application. These two courses will give you an overview of Swift and its basic commands, plus you will learn how to create a simple application.

To register for any of these webinars, or to view recordings of previous webinars, check out http://www.learnnowonline.com/webinars.

About the Author

BrianBlogpicBrian Ewoldt is the Project Manager for LearnNowOnline. Brian joined the team in 2008 after 13 years of working for the computer gaming industry as a producer/project manager. Brian is responsible for all production of courses published by LearnNowOnline. In his spare time, Brian enjoys being with his family, watching many forms of racing, racing online, and racing Go-Karts.

 

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We’re busy, but there’s still time for REST

Yes, it has been a while since I have graced this site with one of my blogs. And I know you are thinking to yourself…Thank God! But in the words of the great of Russell Casse from the movie Independence Day, “Hello, Boys, I’m BAAAAACK!” Okay, so I’m not flying an airplane into an alien spaceship, but I am writing this blog.

Back to the subject at hand. We here at LearnNowOnline have been very busy as you may have noticed. In the hustle and bustle, we have released two great new courses covering RESTful Services featuring expert Jordan Hudgens. Jordan also presented our Ruby courses, and you can watch for more courses from him in the future.

Our new RESTful Services courses pick up where our last series released in September left off. Here’s a look at what’s covered in these latest courses:

RESTful Services: Install, JAX-RS and Jersey
You will get a brief history of RESTful Web Services and how they are integral to modern web applications. You’ll see how to setup your computer to begin developing JAX-RS and Jersey applications, specifically by leveraging Maven scaffold applications from the command line. Watch the course trailer to learn more:

rsa1

RESTful Services: The Server and Client
You will learn how to build a client server application from scratch using the Eclipse IDE and Apache Tomcat Server. You’ll see how you can create resources, how to configure CRUD requests, and how you can access those resources from a client application. Watch the course trailer to learn more:

rsa2

Now that we’re all to speed, watch for more courses coming soon including SSAS 2014, SSIS 2014, Swift, and more.

About the Author

BrianBlogpicBrian Ewoldt is the Project Manager for LearnNowOnline. Brian joined the team in 2008 after 13 years of working for the computer gaming industry as a producer/project manager. Brian is responsible for all production of courses published by LearnNowOnline. In his spare time, Brian enjoys being with his family, watching many forms of racing, racing online, and racing Go-Karts.

 

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